Augmented Reality Links Man and Machine

CXO THOUGHTS
Autor-c-E.Prokofieff080317EP283473.JPG Augmented Reality Links Man and Machine
Clemens Kirner, CEO, Insider Navigation

Communicating with machines is possible – thanks to Augmented Reality

More complex and fully automated machines are both a curse and a blessing: they are more efficient, but it has become far more difficult to obtain important information about their operation and condition. The Vienna-based company Insider Navigation has developed a technology that maps this information in Augmented Reality and thus simplifies everyday production.

To tinker with a machine, to consider what could be the cause of a failure, and finally to have to call the technician: We are all familiar with this scenario. This not only makes us desperate, but it can also temporarily have a negative impact on several production processes. The Vienna-based Augmented Reality company Insider Navigation has developed a technology that makes it possible to communicate with the machines and thus make daily work easier. This not only saves time but also saves costs in production.

How does a harmonious interaction between man and machine work? 

When we think of machines in production, many people are afraid of being replaced by them. But in many professions a harmonious cooperation between man and machine is already part of everyday working life. Employees across all industries are now called upon to train and qualify accordingly – be it in logistics or in the automotive industry. In these two industries workers already need to know exactly how to interact with more complex machines.

“With our technology, we are working to dispel these fears and make room for a good cooperation,” says Clemens Kirner, Augmented Reality expert and CEO of Insider Navigation. With his software, he helps production employees to work intuitively and efficiently with the machines. Thanks to precise data acquisition and the use of augmented reality, the software can communicate with people via mobile devices.

Augmented Reality has long since ceased to be a gimmick  

With increasingly complex and fully automated machines, clear communication is of course an advantage. “For a long time, Augmented Reality was just a gimmick in many companies. The automotive industry and logistics were then the pioneers who really got to grips with the use of Augmented Reality,” says Kirner. That’s why he decided with Insider Navigation to integrate Augmented Reality into everyday production.

Kirner even goes one step further: his software makes the entire building visible, including the machines inside of it. This enables digital data to be linked to the physical environment and, thanks to Augmented Reality, to be found on the mobile display. The software determines live data, which the employees can then view on the mobile device. You will find answers to questions as quickly as possible: Is something missing? Is there a problem? Does something have to be exchanged? “Lengthy processes that cost companies money as well as time are thus made more efficient and simpler,” says Clemens Kirner. Employees can also learn how to use the machine correctly quickly and easily using video instructions that can be stored with the machine data – they no longer have to wait for someone to find the time to help them.